Every Step Along The Way

12 09 2014

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Through all the times and trials of life
God has always been there by my side
every step along the way
to make me see the glory of the day
And so I must say
in my own way
that day to day
I have to pay
Him from my soul
not to the world now
given from above
always with comfort and love
And now here I sit
my face, looking like a catchers mitt
I will subside
like the tide
to allow the growth
to flow on to the know

I’ll settle down
While you’re around
Have Coventry with a cup of tea
To set us forth on yonder course
for worlds we’ll see
are greater than me





Full Circle, the Process of Life

12 09 2014

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Wow, life has a way of coming full circle and giving you closure on things you’ve even forgotten about. Things that were seemingly meaningless but that were a large part of your life at a certain time. Here’s an example of what I’m talking about.

I love music, I’m passionate about it and when I find music that just makes me feel a certain emotion or that touches on a certain vibration within me I have to embrace it. And I don’t care how it sounds to others or how they take it or even if they like it or not. And while I was in my 20s I had a lot of music like this, while my friends listened to mainstream pop, alternative rock and the stuff that was more palatable, I would often stumble upon bands that were in obscurity as far as mass popularity goes, but I would hear them, and if they resonated on that same vibrational wavelength I was on, I naturally integrated them into my music repertoire

Having said that, I am referring to a band called Mission of Burma. I was given a recording of their album VS. by my then girlfriend Sherrie Jacobs and told that I would enjoy them. It was a blank cassette tape and she had told me the name of the band, which I quickly forgot, so I knew the music, but not the name. So I gave them a listen and they soothed my restless soul while rock and roll music was being adulterated by the excesses and debauchery of LA’s now infamous Sunset Strip. And just like when I discovered the Chili Peppers and Jane’s Addiction, Mission of Burma stayed in my cassette player for two months on continuous rotation as I drove to and from work in the Portland/Vancouver area and round and round, here and there working my way through the social network of young adult life.

This was in 1987, and they were a wonderful coupling along with my newly discovered enjoyment of The Red Hot Chili Peppers and then, just around the corner, thankfully, who saved rock and roll from its circling the bathtub drain, Jane’s Addiction.

And then, some 27 years later I am driving across the country from Salt Lake City to Seattle with a new friend, Hans, who I only met the day we left by a craigslist post for a ride. And while we are talking about music and I was introducing him to fIREHOSE and The Minutemen, he then told me that I should listen to Mission of Burma, because fIREHOSE sounds a lot like them.  So after I settled down in Auburn, WA after a couple of weeks I did seek out and find Mission of Burma, and I was taken aback and slammed into a flashback that was purely sublime, remembering that obscure blank cassette tape that Sherri gave me when I left her just a couple of months before.








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